Category: English grammar

Time Changes in Reported Speech | Conditionals and Reported Speech

This video covers time changes that need to be made in correctly reported speech. This video is specifically aimed at

What is reported speech? | Conditionals and Reported Speech

In English, we use reported speech to quote people. When using reported speech, we don’t quote the exact words but

Bookworm | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “bookworm” refers to someone who reads a lot. Can you use this idiom in an example in the

Brainstorm | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “brainstorm” refers to the action of trying to come up with new ideas. Can you use this idiom

Copycat | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “copycat” refers to someone who copies the work of another. Can you use this idiom in an example

To Hit The Books | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “to hit the books” refers to the action of starting to study hard. Can you use this idiom

To Pass With Flying Colors | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “to pass with flying colors” refers to passing something with high grades. Can you use this idiom in

Teacher’s Pet | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “teacher’s pet” refers to the teacher’s favorite student. Can you use this idiom in an example in the

The Zero Conditional | Conditionals and Reported Speech

The zero conditional is used to talk about situations that are generally or always true, such as scientific facts. This

Reported Speech Overview | Conditionals and Reported Speech

This video is a review of the reported speech in the English language. We take a look at the necessary

Reported Speech Teaching Ideas | Conditionals and Reported Speech

This video presents a teaching idea for reported speech. The activity includes having the students walk around the classroom asking

Special Cases in Reported Speech | Conditionals and Reported Speech

This video covers special cases in reported speech that do not follow the typical pattern. This video is specifically aimed

Backshifting Places | Conditionals and Reported Speech

There are certain words that need backshifting when using reported speech. In this video we look at backshifting places in

The Mixed Conditional | Conditionals and Reported Speech

The mixed conditional deals with the present results of imaginary situations in the past. This video is specifically aimed at

The Third Conditional | Conditionals and Reported Speech

The third conditional is used when speaking about regrets and excuses. This video is specifically aimed at teaching the third

The Second Conditional | Conditionals and Reported Speech

The second conditional is used when speaking about dreams, fantasies and hypothetical situations. This video is specifically aimed at teaching

The First Conditional | Conditionals and Reported Speech

The first conditional is used for likely results of possible future situations, as well as promises, threats, warnings or back-up

Zero Conditional Teaching Idea | Conditionals and Reported Speech

The zero conditional is the most basic form of the conditionals in the English language. This is a teaching idea

What Are Conditionals? | Conditionals and Reported Speech

This video is the first video of our series on conditionals and reported speech. The conditionals are commonly referred to

Passive Voice Overview | Modals and Passive Voice

This video provides a detailed overview of the passive voice of the English language. Watch the video to find out

Passive Voice Usages | Modals and Passive Voice

There are certain instances where we tend to use the passive voice instead of the active voice. This is true

Active vs. Passive Voice Part 2 | Modals and Passive Voice

The difference between the active and passive voice is one of the more advanced topics of English grammar. Therefore, it

Active vs. Passive Voice Part 1 | Modals and Passive Voice

The difference between the active and passive voice is one of the more advanced topics of English grammar. Therefore, it

Adapting the main verb | Modals and Passive Voice

Another point that students find difficult to understand is that modal auxiliary verbs have no tense. Some modals cannot be

Semi-Modal Auxiliary Verbs | Modals and Passive Voice

Semi-modal auxiliary verbs can cause a lot of confusion with English students. These auxiliary verbs differ with true modals in

Difficulties for Students | Modals and Passive Voice

This video looks at the difficulties students have when learning modal auxiliary verbs. The number of usages and the modal

How To Teach Modal Auxiliary Verbs | Modals and Passive Voice

There are two main ways of approaching teaching modal auxiliary verbs. One is by selecting one modal auxiliary and one

Giving Advice | Modals and Passive Voice

Another way to approach teaching modal auxiliary verbs is in context, for example, “How to give advice”. This is especially

The modal auxiliary verb “can” | Modals and Passive Voice

This video focuses on the modal auxiliary verb “can”. In the classroom, you probably initially introduce the word “can” in

Main Usages Of Modal Auxiliary Verbs | Modals and Passive Voice

In the English language, there are nine true modal auxiliary verbs. These include: will, would, should, shall, might, may, must,

What are modal auxiliary verbs? | Modals and Passive Voice

This video is part of our series on modals and passive voice. This video focuses on modal auxiliary verbs. The

Egghead | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “egghead” refers to a very studious and academic person. Can you use this idiom in an example in

Big Cheese | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “big cheese” refers to an influential person. Can you use this idiom in an example in the comments

Tough Cookie | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “tough cookie” refers to a very determined person. Can you use this idiom in an example in the

Bad Apple | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “bad apple” refers to a troublemaker. Can you use this idiom in an example in the comments below? Are

Couch Potato | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “couch potato” refers to a lazy person who watches too much TV. Can you use this idiom in

Top Banana | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “top banana” refers to the leader in a group. Can you use this idiom in an example in

Sour Grapes | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “sour grapes” refers to pretending to dislike something you cannot have. Can you use this idiom in an

To Bite Off More Than You Can Chew| Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “to bite off more than you can chew” refers to taking on a task that is too difficult,

A Closed Book | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “a closed book” refers to something that no one knows or understands about. A good example would be:

An Open Book | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “an open book” refers to someone that is easy to get information from. A good example would be:

To Cook the Books | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “to cook the books” means changing accounts and numbers to get money. A good example would be: The

To Go Dutch | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “to go Dutch” means sharing expenses. A good example would be: Mike and I went Dutch on a

Not for All the Tea in China | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “not for all the tea in China” is used for emphasizing that you would not do something, no

When in Rome | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “When in Rome, do as the Romans do” means behaving like locals when visiting a different place. A

Chalk and Cheese | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “chalk and cheese” means being fundamentally different. A good example would be: The twins are like chalk and

As Fit as a Fiddle | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “as fit as a fiddle” means being in good physical condition. A good example would be: My grandma

A Bitter Pill to Swallow | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “a bitter pill to swallow” refers to an unpleasant situation or piece of information. A good example would

To Beat Around the Bush | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “to beat around the bush” is used to avoid speaking directly. A good example would be: Stop beating

Catnap | Ask Linda! | Idioms

The idiom “catnap” refers to a short and light sleep, for example: I like to have a catnap in the

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